The hottest, most record breaking places on the planet!

Have you ever wondered how hot this season gets for other destinations around the world? Many of us are currently enjoying a nice, warm summer in the UK, with temperatures expected to soar in the next few days.

The team at Fulton Umbrellas, who specialise in providing you with a variety of clear umbrellas, wanted to find out which places on the planet have the hottest, most recording breaking temperatures. As a result of this, we put together this list that explores the highest recorded temperatures across the world! Find out which locations are considered some of the hottest on the planet…

 

Wadi Halfa, Sudan

Wadi Halfa is based on the shoreline of Lake Nubia, although the location gets very little rain and has a population of just over 15,000.

Famous for its ferocious dust storms alongside its scorching temperatures, Wadi Halfa (which can be found in northern Sudan) is capable of reaching around 40°C in Summer — although in April 1967, resident shad to endure heat of up to 53°C!

 

Dallol, Ethiopia

As a hydrothermal spot, Dallol — in northern Ethiopia — offers its population an extremely hot environment, as well as a nearby volcano, which erupted in 2011.

The site often hits around 45°C and it actually holds the title for the highest temperature for an inhabited destination (on average) due to it maintaining a temperature of around 40°C between 1960 and 1966!

This African location features geysers, salt formations and acidic hot springs that makes it an amazing place to visit.

 

Tirat Zvi, Israel

Founded by European Jewish immigrants in 1937, this settlement was named after one of the fathers of the Zionist Movement and is today the biggest producer of dates in Israel.

Based a short distance west of the Jordan River, This kibbutz, is populated by a mere 792 people (as of 2016) — perhaps because it can get uncomfortably hot. In June 1942, the location reportedly hit a temperature of 54°C! Although this record has been disputed since, Tirat Zvi still gets an average temperature of around 37°C.

 

Kebili, Tunisia

Found on Africa’s northern coast and near the Italian island of Sicily, Tunisia can be found.

Hitting a record high of 55°C — and with a record low of only 13.9°C in the same month — Kebili is an extremely hot place, indicating it can also claim a place on the list of the globe’s hottest locations. This location also holds the earliest evidence of human habitation in the country, dating back around 200,000 years, and is susceptible to ‘foehn wind’. This is a hot, very dry, down-slope breeze, usually found in mountainous regions.

 

Death Valley, USA

Not only is Death Valley the hottest spot on the planet, but it’s also the driest location in the USA. Its average rainfall is about 5cm, although, it can get windy, has dust storms and is at risk of flash floods. Death Valley’s Badwater Basin is also the lowest point in the USA — 86m below sea level!

 

Death Valley in the Californian Death Valley National Park is named by the Guinness Book of World Records as having the hottest recorded temperature on the globe — 56.7°C in July 1913! Although, the hottest June so far is believed to be in 2016, where the heat reached 52.2°C. Death Valley is a graben, which means it is a low block of land that is bordered by higher areas, and has a desert climate with short, mild winters.

 

Aziziya, Libya

During summer, visitors and residents of Aziziya experience heat of around 48°C and the location has a population of just over 23,000.

Based less than 30 miles south of the Libyan capital city, Tripoli, Aziziya was once the titleholder of ‘Hottest Place on Earth’ with a temperature of 58°C — unfortunately a few factors (like the inexperience of the person who took the recording) voided its title.

 

Lut Desert, Iran

The Lut Desert — also sometimes called the Dasht-e Lut — in Iran has been named by NASA as the hottest surface, although Death Valley has the crown for the overall hottest location. By ‘surface’ experts in the field mean its ‘land skin temperature’, which is the heat level a surface reaches purely after being heated by radiation from the sun.

 

The highest temperature recorded here? 70.6°C in 2005. That’s even too hot to allow life for bacteria! Unsurprisingly, the Lut Desert is one of the world’s driest places, too, and is even an UNESCO World Heritage site (as of 2016).

 

Fortunately, British summers aren’t likely to hit these blistering temperatures! Nonetheless, keep yourself shaded with a men’s, women’s, designer, kids’, or sports umbrella this summer! Or, why not browse our on-trend birdcage, dome and telescopic collections?

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